E.g., 11/21/2014
E.g., 11/21/2014

Sectoral Employment

Sectoral Employment

Certain labor-market sectors experience greater concentrations of foreign-born workers—whether in construction, hospitality, manufacturing, or certain occupations in health care and services. The research collected here examines sectoral employment by nativity; how immigrant workers fare compared to their native-born peers in sectors such as agriculture, construction, health care, IT, and more; and their trajectories within these sectors.

Recent Activity

Reports
July 2009
By Demetrios G. Papademetriou, Doris Meissner, Marc R. Rosenblum, and Madeleine Sumption
Reports
October 2008
By Jeanne Batalova, Michael Fix, and Peter A. Creticos
Policy Briefs
September 2007
By Dovelyn Rannveig Agunias and Neil G. Ruiz
Policy Briefs
March 2007
By Randy Capps, Michael Fix, and Karina Fortuny
Reports
September 2006
By Doris Meissner, Deborah W. Meyers, Demetrios G. Papademetriou, and Michael Fix
Policy Briefs
August 2006
By Julie Murray, Jeanne Batalova, and Michael Fix

Pages

Recent Activity

Books
May, 2009

This book reflects the effort of the Transatlantic Council on Migration to map how profound demographic change is likely to affect the size and character of global migration flows; and how governments can shape immigration policy in a world increasingly attuned to the hunt for talent.

Reports
November 2008

The Middle East and Northern Africa (MENA) and Europe appear to be an ideal demographic match: the former has a large supply of young, active workers, and the latter has a shortage of the youthful, skilled or unskilled labor it needs to sustain its economic competitiveness. MENA is the source of 20 million first-generation migrants, half of them now living in another MENA country and most of the rest in Europe. The region also hosts around the same number within its borders. In addition, the size of MENA’s working-age population will continue to rise sharply in the next two decades while the corresponding segment of the population in Europe will soon start to decline.

Reports
October 2008

This exploratory study provides an unprecedented assessment of the “brain-waste” phenomenon in the United States—a serious waste of human capital resulting from the unemployment or underemployment of highly skilled college-educated immigrants.

Policy Briefs
September 2007

This report investigates how migrant-sending countries can protect their migrant workers abroad by examining the policies, functions, and challenges of the Philippine government’s membership-driven welfare fund, the Overseas Workers Welfare Administration (OWWA).

Policy Briefs
March 2007

This brief investigates the relationship between immigration and the decline in both the overall number and share of native-born workers in the low-wage and lower-skilled labor force.

Reports
September 2006

The culminating report of the Independent Task Force on Immigration and America’s Future seeks to design a new and simplified immigration regime that averts illegal immigration, and at the same time, harnesses the benefits of immigration for the future.

Policy Briefs
August 2006

This report examines the debate over whether immigrants depress wages and displace native workers in the U.S. labor market. It provides an overview of research since the mid-1990s studying the impact of immigration on native wages and job displacement, and reviews additional factors that may affect labor markets.

Policy Briefs
July 2006

Debates on immigration policy often discuss calibrating immigration levels to meet the labor needs of the nation’s economy. Indeed, it is clear that immigration strongly affects U.S. labor markets – over the past thirty years, foreign-born workers have grown to record numbers.

Pages