E.g., 08/05/2015
E.g., 08/05/2015

Health & Welfare Benefits

Health & Welfare Benefits

Health care and public benefits coverage for immigrants varies by country. In the United States, immigrants have extremely low rates of health insurance coverage and poor access to health care services—particularly those who lack U.S. citizenship. Labor migrants to different parts of the world may also face difficulty accessing care. Barriers to access to health care and public benefits has significant implications for immigrants, their children, and the broader society, as the research here explores.

Recent Activity

Reports
January 2009
By Demetrios G. Papademetriou, Madeleine Sumption, and Will Somerville
Reports
April 2008
By Michael Fix, Margie McHugh, Aaron Terrazas, and Laureen Laglagaron
Reports
December 2007
By Cristina Rodríguez , Muzaffar Chishti, and Kimberly Nortman
Policy Briefs
September 2007
By Dovelyn Rannveig Mendoza and Neil G. Ruiz
Online Journal
Fact Sheets
January 2004
By Deborah W. Meyers

Pages

Recent Activity

Fact Sheets
June 2004

This report examines health insurance coverage among the United States’ foreign-born population. Findings highlight differences in coverage rates between native citizens, naturalized foreign-born citizens, and non-citizens.

Fact Sheets
January 2004

This report provides basic information on International Agreements of the Social Security Administration, bilateral agreements that coordinate the United States’ system for retirement, disability. It examines the eligibility criteria for receiving benefits and the concept of “totalization,” particularly with regard to the Social Security Totalization Agreement with Mexico proposed under President Bush’s plans for immigration reform.

Pages