E.g., 09/14/2014
E.g., 09/14/2014

Transatlantic Council on Migration

Transatlantic Council on Migration

Patrick Giblin

Large immigration flows challenge destination cities to find innovative ways to meet the needs of immigrant residents and promote their integration. This report examines the successful integration strategies of five U.S. cities—Cupertino and San Francisco, CA; Littleton, CO; New York City; and Seattle—and offers lessons for local governments looking to implement their own initiatives.

Han Soete

As the initial point of contact for most immigrants, cities see firsthand how both local and national policies affect newcomers and minorities. This report explores the steps cities across Europe are taking to be more inclusive of immigrants and minorities and how these efforts relate to national policies.

Alex Torres

As global demand for talent and human capital increases, cities are becoming more innovative in their efforts to attract and retain residents. Many cities in Europe and North America are now turning to branding strategies to build inclusive identities that appeal to both new and existing residents. This report examines branding strategies and challenges.

Latino Community Credit Union

Although immigrants are more likely to start businesses than their native-born peers, immigrant businesses have significantly lower survival rates. This Transatlantic Council on Migration report examines the obstacles facing immigrant entrepreneurs and offers policy recommendations for local and national governments looking to more fully reap the benefits of immigrant entrepreneurship.

Walhalla/Flickr

This report analyzes the importance of human capital to the development of London's Tech City and sets this discussion in a broader framework linking cities, digital sectors, and highly skilled immigration. Skilled migrants can play critical roles in economic development in high-tech clusters, but policies sometimes make it difficult for firms to make the most of immigration.

Cameron Norman

Immigration alone cannot save Detroit, which has become a byword for urban decline and economic decay. But if carefully managed in the context of a broader economic development strategy, immigration may be a promising tool for boosting Detroit’s economic prospects, stemming population decline, and replenishing diminished city resources.

Recent Activity

Reports
October 2008
By Michael J. White and Inku Subedi
Reports
October 2008
By Demetrios G. Papademetriou, Will Somerville, and Hiroyuki Tanaka
Reports
June 2008
By Elizabeth Collett and Fabian Zuleeg
Reports
April 2008
By Demetrios G. Papademetriou, Annette Heuser, and Hans Martens
Reports
April 2008
By Rainer Bauböck

Pages

Recent Activity

Reports
October 2008

China and India are major players in international migration. Both countries have very large populations that will continue to grow in the coming years. The available pool of potential migrants from China and India will remain high although population size and density (known as demographic variability) will change from year to year in both countries.

Reports
October 2008

This report examines the advantages and disadvantages of two fundamentally different approaches to economic migrant selection—demand driven and employer led systems and human-capital-accumulation focused and government led systems, best illustrated by “points systems,” which apportion numerical values to desirable human-capital characteristics.

Reports
June 2008

This report examines the immigration regimes of European nations, particularly those with points systems and “shortage lists,” and highlights the flaws of such systems which base selection on formal indictors of applicants’ educational qualifications, work experience, previous salary, and occupation.

 

Reports
April 2008

In the Transatlantic Council on Migration’s first statement, the Council concentrates on citizenship, which has become a dynamic policy vehicle for promoting the political incorporation of immigrants and their more complete integration. It is necessary to clarify definitions and imagine broad goals and desired outcomes before attempting to design and implement effective citizenship policies to meet the needs of society as a whole.

Reports
April 2008

This paper proposes a stakeholder principle that should guide citizenship policies in Europe and North America. This principle applies to both immigrants and emigrants. Stakeholders in this sense are those who have a stake in the polity’s future because of the circumstances of their lives.

Reports
April 2008

Over 100 million migrants live in the more developed regions of the world, including nine million in Northern Europe, 22 million in Western Europe and 38 million in the United States. This report takes a closer look at the challenges of immigration for Western countries.

Reports
April 2008

This report looks at how different citizenship policies produce different integration outcomes. The appropriate policy, therefore, depends directly on what policymakers want to achieve.

Reports
April 2008

More than half of all the states in the world, countries of immigration as well as emigration, now tolerate some form or element of dual citizenship. This report goes beyond statistical trends to the heart of these changes and how best to think through the policy answers.

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