E.g., 08/27/2014
E.g., 08/27/2014

Transatlantic Council on Migration

Transatlantic Council on Migration

Alex Torres

As global demand for talent and human capital increases, cities are becoming more innovative in their efforts to attract and retain residents. Many cities in Europe and North America are now turning to branding strategies to build inclusive identities that appeal to both new and existing residents. This report examines branding strategies and challenges.

Latino Community Credit Union

Although immigrants are more likely to start businesses than their native-born peers, immigrant businesses have significantly lower survival rates. This Transatlantic Council on Migration report examines the obstacles facing immigrant entrepreneurs and offers policy recommendations for local and national governments looking to more fully reap the benefits of immigrant entrepreneurship.

Walhalla/Flickr

This report analyzes the importance of human capital to the development of London's Tech City and sets this discussion in a broader framework linking cities, digital sectors, and highly skilled immigration. Skilled migrants can play critical roles in economic development in high-tech clusters, but policies sometimes make it difficult for firms to make the most of immigration.

Cameron Norman

Immigration alone cannot save Detroit, which has become a byword for urban decline and economic decay. But if carefully managed in the context of a broader economic development strategy, immigration may be a promising tool for boosting Detroit’s economic prospects, stemming population decline, and replenishing diminished city resources.

Serhan Umit

Employer-sponsored immigration and subnational visa programs are the two major routes to channel new immigrant arrivals toward particular destinations where their labor is thought to be in high demand. This report assesses regional nomination programs in Australia and Canada, and the efficacy of employer-sponsored immigration in meeting the needs of cities and regions.

London skyline
Lorenzo G./Flickr

While cities and regions experience both the positive and negative effects of immigration firsthand, they are typically at arm’s length, at best, from the policy reins that enable and shape these movements. Immigration policies are rarely calibrated to regional, let alone local, needs. This Transatlantic Council on Migration Statement examines how policymakers at all levels can work together to get more out of immigration.

Recent Activity

Reports
April 2008
By Demetrios G. Papademetriou, Annette Heuser, and Hans Martens
Reports
April 2008
By Rainer Bauböck
Reports
April 2008
By Thomas Faist and Jürgen Gerdes
Reports
September 2007
By Paul Leseman
Reports
March 2007
By Demetrios G. Papademetriou

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Recent Activity

Reports
April 2008

In the Transatlantic Council on Migration’s first statement, the Council concentrates on citizenship, which has become a dynamic policy vehicle for promoting the political incorporation of immigrants and their more complete integration. It is necessary to clarify definitions and imagine broad goals and desired outcomes before attempting to design and implement effective citizenship policies to meet the needs of society as a whole.

Reports
April 2008

This paper proposes a stakeholder principle that should guide citizenship policies in Europe and North America. This principle applies to both immigrants and emigrants. Stakeholders in this sense are those who have a stake in the polity’s future because of the circumstances of their lives.

Reports
April 2008

Over 100 million migrants live in the more developed regions of the world, including nine million in Northern Europe, 22 million in Western Europe and 38 million in the United States. This report takes a closer look at the challenges of immigration for Western countries.

Reports
April 2008

This report looks at how different citizenship policies produce different integration outcomes. The appropriate policy, therefore, depends directly on what policymakers want to achieve.

Reports
April 2008

More than half of all the states in the world, countries of immigration as well as emigration, now tolerate some form or element of dual citizenship. This report goes beyond statistical trends to the heart of these changes and how best to think through the policy answers.

Reports
April 2008

This report examines granting local voting rights in municipal elections to resident non-nationals.

Reports
September 2007

This policy brief outlines the causes of educational disadvantage among young children of immigrants and explores strategies for improving their educational and socioeconomic outlook.

Reports
March 2007

More countries are now significant players in the international migration system than at any time in history. For the biggest such players, migration is sufficiently large to be fueling rapid, profound, and highly visible social and cultural change.

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