E.g., 11/28/2014
E.g., 11/28/2014

Regional Migration Study Group

Regional Migration Study Group

More than any issue, migration shapes and defines the U.S. relationship with Mexico and, increasingly, much of Central America. Thus, getting migration and the issues that fuel and surround it right is vital to the region’s long-term stability, prosperity, and its competitiveness in a fast-changing and unforgiving global economy. Yet, there are no systematic conversations about what a collaborative, regional approach to these issues might look like.

MPI and the Latin American Program/Mexico Institute of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars filled that void by convening a three-year Regional Migration Study Group—consisting of two dozen former officials, civil-society leaders, policy intellectuals, and specialists in the United States, Mexico, El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras and co-chaired by former Mexican President Ernesto Zedillo, former U.S. Secretary of Commerce Carlos Gutierrez, and former Guatemalan Vice President and Foreign Minister Eduardo Stein. Senior government officials from throughout the region were involved in the group as observers.

The Study Group met throughout the region over a three-year period. Its findings and recommendations were informed by more than two dozen commissioned briefing papers and reports that were published in English and Spanish and disseminated widely, using the two partnering institutions’ networks in the region and formidable communications capabilities.

The Study Group's work culminated with a final report that outlines the powerful demographic, economic, and social forces reshaping Mexico and much of Central America and changing longstanding migration dynamics with the United States, and offers 14 findings and recommendations for policymakers in the region. The report offers a forward-looking, pragmatic agenda, focusing on new collaborative approaches on migration and human-capital development to strengthen regional competitiveness.

Read the final report here. The report was ranked in the 2013 Global Go To Think Tank Index as the 11th Best Report Produced by a Think Tank for 2012-2013, and the MPI-Wilson Center's Mexico Institute collaboration on the Regional Migration Study Group was rated the world's 18th Best Institutional Collaboration Involving Two or More Think Tanks. Learn more here.

Recent Activity

Reports
November 2012
By Ralph Espach and Daniel Haering
Reports
October 2012
By Francisco Alba and Manuel Ángel Castillo
Reports
August 2012
By Gordon H. Hanson
Reports
April 2012
By Raymundo Campos-Vazquez and Horacio Sobarzo
Reports
August 2011
By Marc R. Rosenblum and Kate Brick

Pages

Pages

Recent Activity

Reports
December 2012

Crime and insecurity are undermining economic and social prosperity in Mexico and Central America, eroding public trust in government institutions. This report examines current economic, social, and political costs resulting from insecurity, and future implications.

Reports
November 2012

The growth of organized crime in Mexico and Central America has dramatically increased the risks that migrants crossing the region face. As this report outlines, migrants increasingly are forced to seek the assistance of intermediaries, and those unable to afford one are more likely to be abused along the way.

Reports
November 2012

This report outline the long-standing pattern of northern Central American governments' inattention to their borders – probing root causes that range from institutional, economic, and resource challenges to corruption and weak government structures.

 

Reports
October 2012

This report outlines the long-standing pattern of government inattention to borders in Central America's Northern Triangle – probing root causes that range from institutional, economic, and resource challenges to corruption and weak government structures.

Reports
August 2012

This report investigates the reasons behind Mexico’s lackluster economic growth over recent decades. The author identifies lines of argument to explain Mexico’s sluggish growth, assesses the importance of these factors, and offers a road map for confronting this disappointing growth record.

Reports
August 2012

This report summarizes the economic and social development policy achievements of Central American countries over the past 20 years, as well as the notable obstacles to development that remain. The author identifies long-term challenges and outlines how they can be incorporated into a new development agenda.

Reports
April 2012

The economic consequences of emigration on migrants’ countries of origin have long been studied, yet the precise assessment of positive and negative impacts remains complex. This analysis finds that Mexico’s fiscal balance appears to benefit from emigration when considering remittances and labor markets.

Reports
August 2011

Migration to the United States from Mexico and Central America’s Northern Triangle (El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras) has accelerated in the last four decades. This increase has been driven by economic opportunities and facilitated by social networks of friends and family already in the United States.

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