E.g., 09/17/2014
E.g., 09/17/2014

Young Children in Black Immigrant Families Project

Young Children in Black Immigrant Families Project

The U.S. child population is rapidly changing and diversifying, in large part because of immigration. Today, nearly one in four U.S. children under age 18 is the child of an immigrant. While research has focused on the largest of these groups, far less academic attention has been paid to the changing Black child population, with the children of Black immigrants representing an increasing share of the U.S. Black child population. To address this important gap in knowledge, MPI’s National Center on Immigrant Integration Policy conducted a project to examine the well-being and development of children in Black immigrant families in the first decade of life (birth to age 10). Core support for the project comes from the Foundation for Child Development.

This project produced research papers that examine the health, well-being, school readiness, and academic achievement of children in Black immigrant families, most with parents from Africa and the Caribbean.

The culminating work was used to produce a multidisciplinary volume that explores the migration and settlement experiences of Black immigrants to the United States, focusing on contextual factors such as family circumstances, parenting behaviors, social supports, and school climate that influence outcomes during early childhood and the elementary and middle-school years. Its findings hold important policy implications for education, health care, child care, early childhood development, immigrant integration, and refugee assistance. 

Recent Activity

Reports
April 2012
By Randy Capps, Kristen McCabe, and Michael Fix

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Recent Activity

Reports
April 2012

Immigration from the Caribbean to the United States is a relatively recent phenomenon, beginning largely after 1965. This report provides a demographic profile of the 1.7 million Caribbean immigrants in the United States: their geographic settlement, education and workforce characteristics, earnings, modes of entry, and more.

Reports
April 2012

This report finds that the 813,000 U.S. children under the age of 10 who have Black immigrant parents from Africa or the Caribbean generally fall in the middle of multiple well-being indicators, faring less well than Asian and white children but better than their native-born Black and Hispanic peers. Citizenship status, English proficiency, parental characteristics, poverty, housing, and access to social supports are examined.

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